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We challenge ourselves to transform human understanding of the changing Earth by enabling the integration of innovative technologies, open geodetic observations, and research, from pole to pole.

 
 

HIGHLIGHTS

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Data Event Response to the 25 September 2014 Mw 6.2 Earthquake 94km WNW of Willow, Alaska

Data Event Response to the 25 September 2014 Mw 6.2 Earthquake 94km WNW of Willow, Alaska

September 29, 2014

In response to the 25 September 2014 Mw 6.2 Willow, Alaska earthquake, UNAVCO is downloading one-sample-per-second (1-sps or 1 Hz) data from GPS stations within an approximately 100 km radius of the epicenter, as well as from stations near Anchorage, where shaking was felt. These data will be downloaded for the full 24 hour UTC day of the event.

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Data Event Response to the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa Earthquake - 6km NW of American Canyon, California

Data Event Response to the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa Earthquake - 6km NW of American Canyon, California

August 25, 2014

A Mw 6.0 earthquake with its epicenter located 6 km (4 miles) northwest of American Canyon, California and 8 km (5 miles) south southwest of Napa, California, occurred at 3:20 a.m. PDT on August 24, 2014 at a depth of 11.3 km. As a response, UNAVCO is currently downloading data recorded at five-samples-per-second (5 sps) for the full 24 hour UTC day of the event, and one-sample-per-second (1 sps) data for 3 days before and 3 days after the earthquake (7 days total). UNAVCO also produced a fully processed 1-sps borehole strainmeter (BSM) dataset spanning the time period of this event.

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Detecting change through the Clouds: Revealing climate change from a high elevation glacier in the Alaska Range

Detecting change through the Clouds: Revealing climate change from a high elevation glacier in the Alaska Range

July 31, 2014

The main goal of this collaborative Dartmouth-University of Maine-University of New Hampshire project is to reconstruct the history of precipitation and atmospheric circulation in Alaska during the last thousand years using ice core records of snow accumulation.

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Site upgrades bring stations online in the Dominican Republic

Site upgrades bring stations online in the Dominican Republic

July 2, 2014

During the last part of April, UNAVCO and the Oficina Nacional de Meteorología (ONAMET) upgraded communications on COCONet sites CN06, CN08, and CN27 and Jurisdicción Inmobiliaria (JI) sites BARA, LVEG, and SROD in the Dominican Republic, and brought site CN06 online for the first time since it was installed in August 2012.

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SCIENCE SNAPSHOTS

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Plate Boundary Observatory as a Hydrological Network to Monitor Drought

Plate Boundary Observatory as a Hydrological Network to Monitor Drought

September 18, 2014

The Plate Boundary Observatory in the western United States consists of more than 1,100 continuously operating GPS stations deployed to record the Earth’s surface response to tectonics. Now the network is being used as a hydrological monitor. This study shows that the western U.S. lost about 240 gigatons of water in 2013-2014. The observatory is a sensitive hydrological monitor that can help manage water resources.

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Herd of Hadrosaurs in Denali: Insights on Large Herbivores in Warm Polar Region More Than 65 Million Years Ago

Herd of Hadrosaurs in Denali: Insights on Large Herbivores in Warm Polar Region More Than 65 Million Years Ago

August 22, 2014

A large number of tracks of mostly hadrosaurid dinosaur footprints discovered in Denali National Park shows that hadrosaurid herds lived in multigenerational groups, that juveniles had relatively rapid growth rates, and that a warm polar world could support a significant population of large plant-eating dinosaurs.

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Detecting Volcanic Plumes with GPS Data

Detecting Volcanic Plumes with GPS Data

July 26, 2013

GPS data were used to detect volcanic plumes from eruptions of Mount Redoubt in Alaska. Unlike past research, this study relied on the signal strength, or signal to noise ratio (SNR), data. The new method is powerful because simple models can be used to quickly model SNR data and the SNR data are not sensitive to water vapor.

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Unrecognized Rapid Ice Loss in Northeast Greenland Due to Warming

Unrecognized Rapid Ice Loss in Northeast Greenland Due to Warming

May 13, 2014

The ice stream in northeast Greenland shows rapid ice loss because of rising air surface temperatures and the loss of sea ice, which is associated with rising sea surface temperatures. The thinning glaciers are detected by a combination of satellite and aerial imagery plus GPS measurements of ground surface rebound due to rapid ice mass loss. Models do not predict the northeast sector of the continent to show such melting with consequences for under-estimating sea level rise.

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Sea Level Rise on the U.S. Gulf Coast

Sea Level Rise on the U.S. Gulf Coast

February 6, 2013

The Mississippi Delta along the Gulf Coast of the United States is a major site of sediment deposition from the Mississippi River and conversely a major site of wetland loss from rising seas and subsidence. There is debate about how much and when the delta has risen or fallen due to deposition, subsidence, sea level change, and erosion.

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Estimating plate boundary slip during large earthquakes: seafloor geodesy during 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake in Japan

Estimating plate boundary slip during large earthquakes: seafloor geodesy during 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake in Japan

September 1, 2012

The forces of the Japanese Tohoku-oki 2011 magnitude 9.0 earthquake, the fifth most powerful in the past century, set off a large tsunami that further devastated the shaken island. The earthquake and tsunami also badly damaged a six-reactor nuclear power plant in Fukushima, located 241 kilometers north of Tokyo.

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Quality Assessment: A new technique to assess and monitor long-term quality of GPS data

Quality Assessment: A new technique to assess and monitor long-term quality of GPS data

March 7, 2013

Geoff Blewitt and Corne Kreemer of UNR’s Geodetic Laboratory have devised a new processing-based technique for evaluating site quality on an ongoing basis.

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Last modified: Monday, 29-Sep-2014 23:28:57 UTC

 

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